“A failure to disarm”: Colin Powell’s 2003 ppt on slideshare

Check it out: it’s the original PowerPoint file that Colin Powell used for the 2003 UN meeting where he argued in favor of the invasion of Iraq.
As a historical document, it’s quite interesting. It’s remarkable how flimsy the evidence for war looks in retrospect. Remember the aluminum tubes? The “mobile weapons labs” that looked a lot like Winnebagos? The endless recordings of low-level Iraqi officials talking about hiding stuff? The satellite photos? It’s all here. It’s interesting how little emphasis was given to the human rights angle (only 1 out of 45 slides).

I hope that more “historical powerpoint” gets uploaded to SlideShare over time. These are important documents. And our tax dollars paid for their preperation, so they belong to us!

One thought on ““A failure to disarm”: Colin Powell’s 2003 ppt on slideshare

  1. Peter July 23, 2007 / 4:10 pm

    i have to say, even though i didn’t blog about it at the time (i wasn’t blogging yet), i never believed any of the testimony. i thought it was made up. i kept thinking how easy Colin would get ripped by a defense lawyer, if it was actually a serious proceeding. i first got interested in law when watching the clinton proceedings, but i quickly learned that credible evidence seems…credible. there’s a quality to it that is immediately apparent when it is presented and I just thought that everything Powell said would never have been allowed in a court of law – it’d be termed hearsay and speculation and myriad other objections.
    Shoot – none of Powell’s ‘evidence’ would have ever been allowed to be entered as evidence in the first place – the judge probably would’ve jailed Powell for contempt for even _trying_ to submit that hokus pokus nonsense.
    was Iraq even allowed to present evidence? a defense attorney, if you will?
    and if u want to see something really odd, take a gander at this page:
    http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2003/02/20030205-1.html
    looks like self-parody.

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